A Few Words on the Future of Dystopian Dance Party

Hey everybody! As you can probably tell, things have been a little less active than usual around here. Callie has been busy with her (phenomenal) artwork, and I’ve been concentrating on job hunting, writing that actually pays, and my much more popular “side blog,” dance / music / sex / romance. Basically, it’s become clear that Dystopian Dance Party is not sustainable in its current form. But we are nothing if not devoted to our unprofitable side hustles, so we’re not calling it quits. What we are doing is doubling down on our mission as a vanity project with complete disregard for its audience: doing away with any semblance of a monthly schedule, and doing shit that we want, when we want it. At some point, we might bring back monthly podcasts…or we might not. The only way to find out is to subscribe and see what comes up. In the meantime, you know where to find us.

Jheri Curl June: El DeBarge’s “Real Love”

The last week of Jheri Curl June is always a story of decline, and this year’s is no exception: like yesterday’s song by After 7, today’s closing track is more New Jack Swing with a residual curl than it is JCM proper. Hell, El DeBarge even appeared on the cover of its parent album, Gemini, with a hairstyle more appropriate for the dawn of the 1990s–and when El DeBarge loses his jheri curl, you know it’s the end of an era.

But true jheri curls never die, they just deactivate; and so it is that, when you listen past the prominent swingbeat on DeBarge’s 1989 single “Real Love,” you can still hear the echoes of a wetter, silkier bygone era, with those Jimmy Jam-esque keyboard stabs sounding like they came straight out of Minneapolis circa 1985.

So there you have it, we’ve come to the end of another Jheri Curl June. But we’ll be back for more in 2018; and you’re also welcome to check out our usual, only slightly less trivial content starting next week. Thanks for joining us!

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Jheri Curl June: After 7’s “In the Heat of the Moment”

After 7 were formed in 1988, just in time to partake in Jheri Curl Music’s swan song before the genre gave way to the emerging New Jack Swing style. The group consisted of Kevon and Melvin Edmonds–brothers of singer, songwriter, and Jheri Curl June inductee Babyface–as well as Keith Mitchell, who was (incorrectly) rumored to be the cousin of music mogul (and another JCJ featured artist) L.A. Reid. Both Babyface and Reid wrote and produced much of After 7’s 1989 debut album, including their hit single and late Jheri Curl jam, “In the Heat of the Moment.”

Sadly, we’re down to the wire with Jheri Curl June again: tomorrow will be our last post of the year. In the meantime, though, remember to check out the playlists below!

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Jheri Curl June: R.J.’s Latest Arrival’s “Off the Hook (With Your Love)”

The first time I encountered a record by R.J.’s Latest Arrival, it was in a bargain bin at 2nd & Charles in Woodbridge, Virginia. The moment I saw their 1986 album Hold On, with its mid-’80s barbershop’s assortment of jheri curls on the back cover, I knew I had to have it (it helped that it cost less than three dollars).

The second time I encountered a record by R.J.’s Latest Arrival, it was in another bargain bin at another Northern Virginia record store, CD Cellar in Falls Church. This time it was their self-titled 1985 album–their third self-titled album, just for maximum confusion–and I didn’t buy it, because does anyone really need two albums by R.J.’s Latest Arrival?

Despite my sudden financial prudence, however, I’m still sort of fascinated by R.J.’s Latest Arrival. Maybe it’s their clumsy moniker, the meaning of which I still can’t quite parse despite way too much mental energy dedicated to the subject. Or maybe it’s the fact that they’re from Detroit, which always gives me a little swell of home-state pride–even if, like their fellow Michiganders Ready for the World, they seemed hell-bent on sounding like they were from Minneapolis. Whatever the case, they’ll always have a special place in my heart. And while “Off the Hook (With Your Love),” their biggest hit single from 1988, is unlikely to blow any minds–it’s bog-standard Late Jheri Curl, complete with its proto-New Jack beat–it’s a pleasant enough way to wind down our last week of Jheri Curl June. Check it out on the playlists below.

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Jheri Curl June: Terence Trent D’Arby’s “Let’s Go Forward”

The fact that Sananda Maitreya, the artist formerly known as Terence Trent D’Arby, was not considered for Jheri Curl June until our fourth year is surprising. Of course, his music isn’t Jheri Curl proper–few artists were, by the end of the ’80s–but the influence of Michael Jackson and Prince is particularly obvious.

© Columbia Records

Introducing the Hardline According to Terence Trent D’Arby is a debut album with a title as cumbersome as you would expect from the man who once claimed that it’s the most important album since Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart’s Club Band. I will neither support nor dispute that claim, but I will say that for a late ’80s R&B album, Hardline has certainly held up–and while we’re making comparisons, I’d much rather fuck with D’Arby’s album in the background rather than “Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!” I doubt even the most devoted Beatles stans can argue with that.

Anyway, Hardline also garnered D’Arby’s several hit singles, including “Wishing Well” and “Sign Your Name.” But it was the lesser known track “Let’s Go Forward” in which D’Arby was at his most Jheri Curl. The sad robot-like atmosphere of the song sounds like a more mature version of Jesse Johnson’s “I Want My Girl.”

We’re nearing the end of Jheri Curl June, but there are still a few posts left; meanwhile, check out the playlists below!

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